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Archive for March, 2008

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Special thanks to the Cleveland Plain Dealer for the following summary of the remaining Presidential Candidates poverty platforms. More information can be found on the PD blog at the following link

Plain Dealer Blog.

Poverty platform:

Clinton:
• The author of “It Takes A Village: And Other Lessons Children Teach Us” targets the nearly 13 million children living in poverty, calling it a “blight on our nation’s conscience and our economic future.”
• The senator’s nine-page position paper focuses on specific actions she would take on issues ranging from enforcing child support payments to nurse home visitation for new at-risk mothers.
On a larger scale, the Senator touts universal health care, a moratorium on foreclosures, and the creation of at least 5 million “green collar” jobs for low-wage workers.

Obama:
• The former Chicago activist describes his anti-poverty policies as “the single most important focus of my economic agenda as president.”
• Details are sketchy, but include access to safe, affordable housing, job programs, and financial and medical assistance to single parents.

McCain:
• America’s most famous POW takes aim at urban poverty by taking back the streets, improving urban school systems and updating job training programs.
• Again, specifics are vague.

New ideas:

Clinton:
•The former first lady would work to end child hunger by strengthening the food stamp program, improving the food safety net and providing more access to healthy, fresh food.
•She would provide economic opportunity to low-income families by raising the minimum wage, and expanding new job training opportunities.
•She would also establish a pilot program to reduce homelessness among veterans, and develop a community based re-entry plan to help ex-offenders receive job training and placement as well as drug and mental health counseling.

Obama:
• The son of a single mother, his most ambitious anti-poverty policy would be to replicate the success of the Harlem Children’s Zone in 20 cities nationwide.
• He also wants to spend $1 billion for a jobs program that would place the unemployed into temporary jobs and train them for permanent ones.
• He would also offer incentives for businesses to relocate, or start-up, in distressed inner cities.

McCain
• The former naval aviator equates economic prosperity to the war on terrorism. “For the same reason you have to fight the war against the Islamic extremists on the international level, you have to ensure the streets are safe so people can go to work and businesses can operate,’ said the senator’s senior policy advisor.
• The burgeoning crime rate is compounded by an inhospitable economic climate that McCain would fight by lowering taxes and improving business investment incentives.

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PUSH Buffalo is accepting applicants for its 129 Chenango Street Co-op. Information meetings will be held March 8, 1pm and March 11, 7pm, 271 Grant St.

The co-op arrangement offers residents a chance to save money while they rent, and through a matching program with the Federal Government and M&T Bank, secure funds to make a down-payment on a home.

There are three units in 129 Chenango – 2 2-bedrooms and 1 1-bedroom.

For more information, visit the PUSH Buffalo website or call 796 -5008

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The WNY Coalition for the Homeless, a group that the Homeless Alliance partners with frequently, will be presenting a free workshop on permanent housing options in Erie County. It is a half-day workshop with speakers from a variety of permanent housing providers throughout the County such as Buffalo Municipal Housing Authority, Rental Assistance Corporation, Belmont Shelter Corporation, People Inc., etc. There are also presentations on evictions and tenants’ rights.

When: Wednesday, April 2nd, 8:30 – noon
Where: SS. Columba and Brigid Roman Catholic Church (corner of Hickory and Eagle St.)

The Workshop is Free; RSVP required.
Call Adrian Slocum at Catholic Charities,  856-4494 x3010

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